Canadian Spellings to Watch Out For: “C” Vs. “S”

Montreal Syllabus TranslationAs Canadians, much of our news and entertainment comes from the United States. This makes it easy to get influenced by American spelling which—here and there—differs from our own.

One small, yet significant way we differ is with words that have a separate spelling for the noun and verb forms. Luckily, this only happens twice, so it’s easy to remember!

The first word to watch out for is licence, which in Canada is a noun and an adjective.

For example: I have a driver’s licence. I lost my licence plate.

However, the verb and participle form is license.

For example: The company licensed its product. He’s a licensed driver.

But in the US, license is both a noun and verb.

The second word to watch out for is practice, which in Canada is a noun.

For example: It sounds good in theory, but not in practice.

However, the verb and participle form is practise.

For example: I have to practise the piano. He’s a practised assassin.

But in the US, practice is both a noun and verb.

Know of any tricky Canadian spellings to watch out for? Let us know!

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